Chance of a Thunderstorm
Weather for San José:
High 29° / Low 18°
Chance of a Thunderstorm
Click here for six-day forecast for 16 communities across Costa Rica!
CLICK HERE TO
SIGN UP FOR OUR FREE DAILY NEWSLETTER
BUY
545.00
SELL
557.00
BUY
606.26
SELL
636.26
BUY
414.80
SELL
438.80
Banco BAC
Banco BCR
Banco Nacional
Banco Popular
Banco Scotiabank

No Salary for Recycling Center Employees in Nosara

Share this article

Recycling in Nosara Costa Rica

Recycling Center employees in Nosara Costa Rica

Beginning in September of 2013, the Institute for Social Assistance (Instituto Mixto de Ayuda Social – IMAS) was giving 1 million colones ($2,000) every month to the Recycling Center in Nosara to provide a salary of 100,000 colones ($200) to all of its ten female employees. This subsidy was cut off completely in the month of December, and now the women are working without a salary until IMAS approves its budget once again.

Alvaro Camacho, administrator of the center, says that the group of women has taken ownership of the project and loves their work. In the last four months, they have worked to clean streets, beaches and rivers. They also give environmental education talks about waste separation, its benefits, and problems related to trash.

For the group of women, this problem is surprising and directly affects them, as they have bills to pay and families to feed. “For now we are without pay, but Don Alvaro is looking for sponsorship options as well as selling crafts. We try to go to fairs, and we set up stands at the supermarket to sell crafts to the community,” says Yolanda Lopez.

To compensate and motivate the workers, the Nosara Recycling Association will be giving them an intensive English course in the David Kitson Library. In addition, they’ll be given more workshops to continue making crafts from recycled waste.

In the meantime, the center still lacks water and electricity connections, due to legal processes. This represents another problem regarding income for the project, as they haven’t been able to sell the recycled material and it is being stored in the work space. For security, it’s necessary to use special machines to compact and crush the material.

“Without support from IMAS, we have to find a way to raise funds, such as crafts or donations from the community to hire women with a reasonable salary,” explained Camacho.

If you want to make a donation or buy one of the crafts write to [email protected] or visit the collection center directly.

Article by Voice of Guanacaste

Print Friendly

Related Articles

Costa Rica Participates in 2nd UN Arms Trade Treaty Conference

By Wendy Anders This morning in Geneva, Switzerland, Costa Rica’s Security Minister Gustavo Mata [...]

Obama and Solis Met on Security, Migration, and More in DC Today

By Wendy Anders Today President Obama and Vice President Biden received Costa Rican President Luis [...]

National Dish of Costa Rica Goes Global With New Campaign

Adding a sexy, healthy spin to our familiar breakfast menu of pancakes, eggs and cereal is now easier [...]

Taxistas vs Uber – Surprise Protests Announced, Plus New Platform

By Wendy Anders Official (red) taxi representatives cancelled a meeting last Tuesday that they had [...]

Costa Rica Police Rescued Baby Horse from Caiman-Infested Waters

A young colt that was about to become a meal for hungry caimans is happily galloping today thanks to a [...]

Suspected Tomb Raider Gets Raided in Costa Rica

On Friday afternoon, agents from the Office of Judicial Investigations (Spanish initials: OIJ) raided a [...]

Costa Rica is the First Nation to Ratify Convention Against Racism

Washington, D.C. — The Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR) welcomes Costa Rica’s [...]

Man Gunned Down at Sexual Tourism Hotel in Costa Rica

A 45-year old man survived a shooting that took place just outside of the Del Rey Hotel, a major sexual [...]