Costa Rica’s Return to Forest in the Midst of Latin America’s Deforestation

Share this article
Click image to enlarge

While Latin America as a whole has experienced marked deforestation, Costa Rica has proved the notable exception, and has sustained and even increased its forest cover, said a climate investigation published in the University of Costa Rica’s weekly Semanario Universidad.

What has led to Costa Rica’s success? The United Nations Organization for Agriculture (FAO) says state support and incentives to preserve forests have played a key role.

Costa Rica’s environmental services payment program (PSA, its initials in Spanish) is one of the most successful environmental public policies in the country’s history, and has been used as a model for other countries.

The country went from having 75 percent forest cover in 1940 to an all time low of 21 percent in 1987, as shown in the infographic included above by Revista Vacío.

Today, more than half of the country is forested and, about 50 percent of forested lands are classified as protected.

The environmental service payment program was formalized in 1997, having morphed out of some similar previous programs. Between 1996 and 2015, investments in forest-related PSA projects in Costa Rica reached US$318 million, according to the FAO.

The program pays for four types of “environmental services” on forested lands. These include carbon capture; water protection for rural, urban or hydroelectric use; protection of biodiversity; and natural scenic beauty or value for tourism and/or scientific purposes. In essence, the program is simple: if you keep the forest on your property, Costa Rica will pay you.

The report in Semanario Universidad found that the environmental service payment program tends to be more effective in areas far from national parks. This appears to be related to the fact that owners of lands near national parks can often find more lucrative uses for their land due to the presence of tourism, and so conserving forest for government payments is not as attractive as in more remote areas.

An important finding for the FAO was that while other Latin American countries cleared forests to make room for agricultural production, Costa Rica was able to increase conservation and sustainable management of forests without jeopardizing their food security. In fact, the FAO found that 70 percent of deforestation in Latin America between 2000 and 2010 occurred to make way for commercial agriculture.

Costa Rica has increased its food security since the 1990s by increasing agricultural productivity and importing food from countries with lower production costs, according to the recent FAO report.

While there continue to be poor, landless and vulnerable rural families suffering from food insecurity, Costa Rica appears to be heading the right way and has found a way to preserve its forest cover while maintaining good levels of food security, said the report.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Comments

Related Articles

La Romeria Pilgrimage is Not for Dogs – Says Animal Health Service in Costa Rica

Like every year hundreds of thousands of Costa Ricans are preparing for the annual pilgrimage to La [...]

Expansion of Bridge Connecting Belen and Lindora Will Be Ready Early August

The expansion of the bridge over the Virilla River which connects Belen in Heredia, with Lindora in Santa [...]

Migration Offices in Costa Rica Enabled Phone Service For Refugee Applications

The General Directorate of Migration in Costa Rica announced that as of this Wednesday, June 18 it will [...]

360° Sights of 76 Tourist Locations in Costa Rica Are Now Part of Google Special Collections

Google announced the arrival of its Special Collections to Costa Rica. This option is part of Google [...]

Popular Content